Our Trip to Italy: Lessons Learned and Great Restaurants

We had a wonderful 2 1/2 weeks in Italy this fall. It’s a trip we’d been planning for ages, and it was postponed from last spring after my father became terminally ill, so it was bittersweet in some ways.

While I do plan to share some of my 1,600 photos of familiar tourist sites online, I want to talk a little about the things the tourist guides and Websites manage to overlook.

Printed Maps Matter. Most of the traveling we’ve done over the last 20 years has been in the US, Canada, the UK, Ireland and Australia. Online maps work well in those areas. However, Italy chews up and spits out online maps, especially when you’re walking. We wasted a lot of time (and probably more money than we think on international roaming fees) because we thought the online map software would work fine in places like Venice and Rome. Nope. And what you don’t realize until you’re there is that street names change frequently. What we thought of as “Via Croce” in Naples had a different name about every 50 yards. Complicating things even more was that street signs on buildings are very erratic – non-existent, really faded and hard to read and sometimes the streets were inconsistently named. So we did a lot of walking while lost in Italy, particularly in Venice and Bologna. It was fun at times, but also very, very frustrating.

What we should have done, once we used online sources and books to figure out where we wanted to stay, was to buy some of the excellent detailed local maps, study them, make notes about places we planned to go and rely more on traditional printed maps than online maps. We found the Rick Steves pocket guides to the cities helpful, but studying detailed maps in advance would have saved us time, money and frustration. Before you go, pre-print all mass transit maps for your city. We never used mass transit in Florence as it was so walkable, but having more familiarity with mass transit for Rome and Naples would have been invaluable.

The hard lesson we especially learned in Bologna – never enter the name of a site in an online map site in Italy, only enter a street address. We were looking for a particular museum, entered the name into AppleMaps, and wound up walking miles away from where we’d intended.

Signs Matter. Signage in Italy is wildly, wildly erratic. Sometimes, signs were very helpful. You’ll find many signs in Rome that will help you get to the Pantheon and the Collesium. But signs that should exist don’t always. I’d thought there was a train between Rome’s Termini train station and the FCO Airport. At Termini, we couldn’t find any info on the train to the FCO airport. There isn’t a central info booth in many places, like train stations. There were signs about the bus to the airport, but the signs often led to dead ends. It took over a half hour to find the bus to the airport. The next day, at the airport, we saw signs there about the train between the airport and Termini! Sigh.

Another place where signage was dreadful was for the Circumvesuviana line train from Naples to Pompeii. The Metro in Naples is clean, well-signed and inexpensive. However, the Circumvesuviana is a privately-run train system to the Naples suburbs and while it’s inexpensive, it’s a mess. We missed the one sign that partially explained what we needed to know. There are at least five lines on this train system and the right one for old Pompeii isn’t obvious. Some local people helped us out – but we wound up on the “slightly wrong” train, the one the went to “new Pompeii” instead of “old Pompeii.” And it was pouring rain when we reached new Pompeii. So we paid 15E to take a cab 3 km from the new station to the old station. Pompeii is still very much worth it – a highlight despite the pouring rain – but getting there was quite frustrating.

City Cards. Many cities have cards you can buy that might give you free admission to some places, discounts and some public transportation. The cost of these cards vary wildly from city to city. We bought a card for Venice and maybe lost a couple of Euros on the deal. But the Venice card included bus transit from the airport to the train station, though not the more direct Alilaguna from the airport to just outside of San Marco. The Florence card was particularly expensive so we didn’t buy it. The Roma card wasn’t too expensive, but we just didn’t buy it. We wanted to buy the Naples card as it was a great deal, but when we went up to the National Archeological Museum, they were no longer selling it (even though official Naples Website said they were!).

“Skip the Line”. In general, “skip the line” for attractions is not necessary, at least in late October/early November. We got into everything we wanted to except for climbing Il Duomo in Florence where the reservations fill up, especially on the weekends (it turns out I could not have done this anyway, and Jim probably wouldn’t have). We did get a reservation for the Vatican Museum on a weekday which was necessary. The extra fee for dealing directly with the museum/attraction is 4E; you do not need to go through any tour company to skip the line (and you’ll save lots of money if you make your own reservation). The longest lines we had anywhere were for St. Peters (in the rain) and for Pitti Palace in Florence – both about 45 minutes long. As we tended to go to places early, we had either no wait at all or about 10 minutes. Our main failure was to not go to the Vatican Museum in the morning – the crowds there in the afternoon are massive. The crowds in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence are large but not as large as for the Vatican Museum. There were almost no crowds at all in Ostia (ruins of an ancient trading down outside of Rome) or in the National Archeological Museum in Naples. After you do something that’s hugely crowded, you’ll do yourself a favor to then go to something quieter or just go back to your room for a siesta.

Rain Gear. The first 11 days of the trip were rain-free, but the last few days…no. Was reminded my jacket, while water-resistant, was not waterproof. Jim gloated as he did have a waterproof jacket. We should have brought our small umbrella (wound up buying a 5E umbrella while standing in line for St. Peter’s Basilica) and baseball caps with the long front brims to keep the rain off our faces.

Restaurants. Most restaurants are pretty good and will treat you well. The only time we felt cheated was at a little restaurant just off of San Marco in Venice. We were jet-lagged and starved our first day in Venice, and the food was pretty good there. But this place said it didn’t sell wine by the glass, so Jim bought a half-bottle of wine. And that bottle cost about 25E, an insane price we later learned. The vast majority of restaurants sell glasses of house wine for about 3-7E. Unlike at most American restaurants, house wine at Italian restaurants is usually pretty good.

We failed to make any restaurant reservations for dinner in advance, but that only bit us once – in Bologna. Always wanted to try a place with a Michelin star and there was one in Bologna with an intriguing menu wasn’t terribly expensive. But when we checked with the restaurant, their only open spot was at 9:30 which was too late. But we had three fabulous meals in Venice, Florence and Rome in excellent restaurants by making reservations the same day for 7pm. We highly recommend these three restaurants for special meals in Italy:

  • Venice: Ristorante Antica Sacrestia – this is not very far from San Marco. Brick walls, very warm and inviting, lovely traditional food.
  • Florence: Ristorante Cibreo, Via dei Macci – hands down the best meal of the trip. Fixed price for each course (you don’t need to have every course), extensive and interesting wine list. They don’t have a menu, but they have about six choices for each course which they explain to you. They also gave you little dishes of kind of an experimental antipasto which was excellent. Cibreo also has a few less-expensive, related variants in the same area, but for the full experience, go to Ristorante Cibreo.
  • Rome: Taverna Trilussa, in the Trastavere neighborhood near Ponte Sisto (their Website is flakey so I’m linking to the TripAdvisor page instead) A fascinating restaurant with amazing cheese (and meat) plates, excellent pasta dishes.

Other recommendations: We had the full Tuscan steak experience in Florence at 4 Leoni, not far from Ponte Vecchio across the river from “downtown Florence.” This does not need to be an expensive dinner and they have plenty of pasta dishes if you’re not a carnivore. You can get great pizza and Italian craft been in Rome at Roma Beer Company, Campo Fiori. We had some of the best pizza in Naples at Pizzeria Trianon which is in an older part of the city not far from the train station. Jim had a seven cheese pizza which was fantastic. Had an interesting dinner our first night in Naples at Trattoria del Golfo, a fish/Genoese-style restaurant near Umberto Galleria. The Genoese pasta is a little like eating long-simmered onion soup with a little beef over pasta – YUM!

When you want to try out a restaurant in a city you don’t know (and you don’t want to use cabs to get there), scope out the restaurant by day to make sure you know how to get there. We generally stuck to restaurants that were within about a mile of our hotel or apartment.

FANAC Science Fiction Fan History – Latest Photos & Scanned Zines

With the permission of the LASFS board, we have started putting up some Shangri-LA issues. We have issues from the 1940s & 1950s. Scanning by Joe Siclari. Shangri-LA was one of the official organs of the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society.

George Phillies sent us a PDFs of October 2017’s issue of The National Fantasy Fan Federation’s The National Fantasy Fan. Thanks George.

Five more issues of the Lynch’s CHAT the newszine of the Chattanooga Science Fiction Association. These are from 1979-1981. Scanning by Richard Lynch. Thanks Richard!

More File 770s, 1983 and 1984 Scanning thanks to Mark Olson. We have put online 2267 newszines so far, with the earliest from April 1938, and the most recent from 2011. That April 1938 newszine, Science Fiction Newsletter published by Dick Wilson, appeared only 12 years after the first science fiction magazine hit the newsstand. Dick was 17 at the time, and his first short story was published in Astonishing Stories two years later.

Ever hear of Claude Degler? You can read the Fancyclopedia 2 article about him. Degler and his Cosmic Circle were the center of fannish furor in the 1940s (and deservedly so). Here is a whack of the original materials published by and about the Cosmic Circle Here you’ll find both external criticism (so marked) and the Cosmic Circle fanzines. Today, a whack equals 44 publications. Included are almost the entire run of Cosmic Circle Commentator and three Fanews Analyzer. All scanning by Joe Siclari. Thanks Joe!

We added the latest issues of the Mt. Holz Science Fiction Society’s newsletter The MT Void, Vol. 36, No. 15 & No. 16 that was sent to us by Mark and Evelyn Leeper. Thank you both.

We’ve added issue 23 of Rhodomagnetic Digest scanning by Gideon Marcus. Thanks Gideon!

Added issue 13 of Bruce Sterling’s Cheap Truth from 1985.

Who was who in 1940 in fandom? We have the answer here. What we don’t know is who it was that produced this publication. If you do, please let us know. Send the info to fanac@fanac.org.

You can’t tell the BNFs without a scorecard, or at least a Who’s Who. We’ve added L.D. Broyle’s Who’s Who from 1961 under Fannish Reference Works. Here you can read about folks like Roger Ebert, Dick Eney, Rick Sneary and more. What did the world (or at least Broyle) think of Harlan Ellison in 1961? Of Bjo? Read it here. Broyle even included what kind of audio equipment each fan had. Scanning by Mark Olson.

Dale Speirs sent us PDFs of issues 394, 393, 44.1A, 44, 43.1A, 43.1B of his perzine Opuntia. Thanks Dale.

We have updated the Fanac Names Cross Reference. There are currently 25,205 names in these listings.

FANAC: Science Fiction Fan History – Latest Photos & Scanned Zines

Ready for your close up? Maybe it’s already online, check photos from the SMOFcon 34, Rosemont, Illinois, 2016. Many of these were taken by Rick Katze. Thanks Rick! The rest were taken by Edie Stern. We also put up a batch of photo from Tropicon 19, 2000, including many South Florida fans. These are from the collection of Joe Siclari. If you can identify the folks marked as ???, please let us know who they are. It’s easy to fill in an update form. You’ll see the “Click Here” button near the caption.

More fannish news from ’79-’83 thanks to Mark Olson’s scanning, we’ve added many more issues of Mike Glyer’s File 770. Check out file770.com.

Thanks to the scanning of Richard Lynch, we have 18 issues of CHAT, the newszine of the Chattanooga Science Fiction Association. With co-editor Nicki Lynch, the zine also covered fannish news of the region and the nation.

Today’s update includes Ron Bennett’s TAFF report. The report was published in 1961 and covers his TAFF trip in 1958. Want to see what fandom was like almost 60 years ago? Read the report.

We have added the latest issue of the Mt. Holz Science Fiction Society’s newsletter The MT Void, Vol. 36, No. 13, that was sent to us by Mark and Evelyn Leeper. Thank you both

Added the latest issue of John Thiel’s Ionisphere. Thanks!

Added issues 27 and 29 of the 40s cardzine QX. These issues happen not to be cards, and are not dated, but I think they are from 1945. Warning – these are not the best zines of the run. Scanning courtesy of Joe Siclari.

Dale Speirs sent us PDFs of issues 392, 391, 43, 42.5, 42.1 & 42 of his perzine Opuntia. Thanks Dale.

Why Massacres Are ALWAYS Terrorist Acts

Many people have a very narrow definition of terrorism – it’s always related to a political stance. So 9/11 was a terrorist act, as were the car attacks in France and Germany and the shooting massacres in Mumbai and Paris.

And it’s interesting that all of those were related to Islamic terrorists. Because, in America, there is the common belief that terrorists have to be brown male Muslims to be “real terrorists.”

I don’t believe that.

I believe the act of a mass shooting, mass bombing or car attack by a disaffected person of any gender, race, religion, or ethnic background is a terrorist attack. Those random attacks on people they don’t know are meant to inspire terror and fear. Anyone called a lone wolf, which which American mass murderers are typically called, is really a terrorist.

Yes, the Las Vegas massacre was a terrorist act, as was Pulse, as was Sandy Hook, as was Virginia Tech, as was Oklahoma City, as were the Unibomber bombings well, the list goes on.

So long as our government is only looking at the danger of Muslim terrorists, they will continue to ignore the murders enabled by our government’s lenient view on the danger of guns, particularly the danger of semi-automatic and automatic weapons that some nutjobs are able to get and use.

Why do you think, in most terrorist acts in Europe in recent years, terrorists used knives and trucks and not guns? Guns are restricted in much of Europe, meaning gun deaths are not nearly as common there as they are here, whether by terrorists or everyday criminals. http://www.humanosphere.org/science/2016/06/visualizing-gun-deaths-comparing-u-s-rest-world/.

How many more massacres will we have in this country before the Congress and our state legislators stand up to the NRA and say enough is enough!

When you write about these massacres, never use the murderer’s name and never care about their “rationale” for murder. Don’t give them additional publicity. Only talk about the location of the murders, and what we must do to fight these terrorists – pass better gun and ammunition laws. And elect legislators with the guts to stand up to the NRA.

#LasVegasMassacre #ActForVegas #PassSaneGunLaws

Some folks on Twitter have done a good job in reminding us that, in some state law, there is no connection between the political/religions/ethnic beliefs of a person and terrorist murders like those committed in Las Vegas on 10/2/2017. Here is the definition of terrorism for in the laws of the state of Nevada:

More details on Nevada laws about terrorism.

US law definition of domestic terrorism:

More details on US laws about domestic terrorism.

The CIA view of terrorism is slightly different.

FANAC: Science Fiction Fan History: Latest Features & Scanned Fanzines

It’s 25 years since MagiCon! To celebrate, we’ve uploaded a video of MagiCon Guest of Honor Vincent Di Fate speaking on “Science Fiction, Spirit of Youth” This far ranging talk includes an illuminating discussion of Frank R. Paul and how he affected the field. Vin also talks about his own influences, and science fiction film. At a 1980s Tropicon, Vin’s Guest of Honor speech centered on being a science fiction guy. That enthusiasm comes out loud and clear in this video. Check it out!

MagiCon was the first project of FANAC, Inc. and eventually provided the seed money for the Fan History Project. Our Guests of Honor were Jack Vance, Vincent Di Fate and Walt Willis. To see our photos from the convention, click here. Mike Glyer has celebrated the anniversary by republishing his contemporaneous convention report at File 770.

We have fond memories of the Enchanted Duplicator miniature golf course, of the amazing History of Art retrospective led by GoH Vincent Di Fate, and of our Fan Lounge, which people have said is the standard by which all subsequent fan lounges are judged. At the closing ceremonies we celebrated the field by creating a time capsule, which was surprisingly emotional. After a quarter of a century, we’re planning to open it soon. soon. Watch this space.

We have updated the Fanac Names Cross Reference. There are currently 25,082 names in these listings.

Added 5 more issues of Mike Glyer’s newszine File 770 from 1978 and 1979 thanks to the scanning of Mark Olson.

We have added the latest issue of the Mt. Holz Science Fiction Society’s newsletter The MT Void, Vol. 36, No. 11 sent to us by Mark and Evelyn Leeper. Thank you both.

We have added 27 issues of Bob Tucker’s seminal humor zine Le Zombie. Combined with news and gossip, this “Ghoul’s Ghazette” was a must read of the time, and is still entertaining. He often quoted people or commented in such a way that the feuds of the day were clearly exposed. Lee Hoffman was Bob’s fannish granddaughter, and we have added all 3 issues of her 1956 history zine Fanhistory. You might notice a similarity in the covers for Fanhistory and in the covers of Lee’s earlier focal point zine, Quandry.

Want some truth? Some Cheap Truth? 16 issues of the Vincent Omniaveritas (Bruce Sterling) fanzine from the mid80s are now online. Scanning is thanks to Joe Siclari.

Thanks to Joe’s scanning, we also have added news of the day. For days in March 1947, see Tympany 2.

For Australian days in May 1959, see Merv Binns’s Australian Science Fiction Newsletter 3. For more Australian news, this time from October 1978, we have Merv Binns’s Australian SF News 5. If you like your Australian news more media oriented, we’ve added the first issue of Sweetness and Light.

For news of Europe, we’ve put up 6 issues (mostly from 1984) of Shards of Babel.

George Phillies sent us a PDFs of the September & August 2017 issues of The National Fantasy Fan Federation’s The National Fantasy Fan. Thanks George.

Dale Speirs sent us PDFs of issues #389, #390, #41.1B, #41.1C, #41.1D.pdf (5.4 MB), and #41.5 (5.1 MB) of his perzine Opuntia. Thanks Dale.

FANAC Science Fiction Fan History: Latest Features & Scanned Fanzines

Thanks to Jack Weaver, our site builder and webmaster for FANAC’s first 20 years, we have a new FANAC.ORG feature! If you look at the fanzine list (either classic pre-1980 or modern post-1980) you’ll see a count on the right of how many issues are online at fanac.org and an indicator if the fanzine is new or updated, or if the run of fanzines is complete. Check it out!

Back to the 40s–we’ve added 26 issues of the newszine FanewsCard from late 1943 – mid 1944. Scanning courtesy of Joe Siclari. Thanks Joe!

We have added the latest issue of the Mt. Holz Science Fiction Society’s newsletter The MT Void, Vol. 36, No. 7 that was sent to us by Mark and Evelyn Leeper. Thank you both

News today about Western North American fandom in David Nee’s Sanders. We’ve added 12 issues from 1971 and 1972. Scans by Joe Siclari.

Six issues of Mike Glyer’s File 770 and one 1991 issue of the European newsletter Shards of Babel Scans by Mark Olson.

We added a small picture of Carol Hoag, http://www.fanac.org/worldcon/IguanaCon/w78a024.jpeg Iguanacon registration head, thanks to Tim Kyger.

Adding a few more issues of various newszines. Issue 4 of Vince Clarke’s Science Fantasy News from 1949. Two issues of Graham Stone’s Science Fiction News from 1985. That last is from Australia. Want to know more about these people? Check out the articles about them in Fancyclopedia.

Dale Speirs sent us PDFs of issues #387, #40.1, #40.2, #40, #388, #40.2, #40.5, & #41.1A of his perzine Opuntia. Thanks Dale.

News and anecdotes (including one about Isaac and Harlan) from 1953 in 9 issues of a newly scanned fanzine Saturday Morning Gazette. This was edited by John Mangnus, and scanned by Joe Siclari. The editor’s nickname for the magazine? “Smug.”

We added the August issue of Leybl Botwinik’s CyberCozen. Thanks, Leybl!

Mark Olson has been scanning. Thanks to him we have issue 15 and issue 17 of Pete Weston’s Speculation. Thanks Mark!